BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!

For the very first time, researchers in Philadelphia have found a way to completely delete the HIV virus  from human cells by ‘snipping’ them out. The process could also provide a cure for other latent infections!

This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for AIDS. It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction,” said Kamel Khalili, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple.

BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!

HOW THE PROCESS WORKS 

BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!

BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!

BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!

BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!

Researchers based the two-part HIV-1 editor on a system that evolved as a bacterial defense mechanism to protect against infection. 

When deployed, a combination of a DNA-snipping enzyme called a nuclease and a targeting strand of RNA called a guide RNA (gRNA) hunt down the viral genome and remove the HIV-1 DNA. Dr Khalili’s lab engineered a 20-nucleotide strand of gRNA to target the HIV-1 DNA and paired it with a DNA-sniping enzyme called Cas9 and used to edit the human genome.

From there, the cell’s gene repair machinery takes over, soldering the loose ends of the genome back together – resulting in virus-free cells. Since HIV-1 is never cleared by the immune system, removal of the virus is required in order to cure the disease,’ explained Dr Khalili. These molecular tools also hold promise as a therapeutic vaccine; cells armed with the nuclease-RNA combination proved impervious to HIV infection.

BREAKING NEWS: The Cure For AIDS Is Already Here!
Worldwide, more than 33 million people have HIV, including more than 1 million in the United States. ‘We want to eradicate every single copy of HIV-1 from the patient. That will cure AIDS. I think this technology is the way we can do it,” said Kamel Khalili, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple.

According to Dr. Khalili, the HIV-1 eradication approach faces several significant challenges before the technique is ready for patients. Hence, the researchers must devise a method to deliver the therapeutic agent to every single infected cell. Finally, because HIV-1 is prone to mutations, treatment may need to be individualized for each patient’s unique viral sequences.

 

 

credits to dailymail

  • Yuan Rico

    Would there be a chance to bring forth side effects or any disharmonious encounter when cutting out and re-introduce single gene from the DNA???????

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