Did You Know That This World’s Largest Telescope Blasted Off A Mountain Top For It To Launch?

Did You Know That This World's Largest Telescope Blasted Off A Mountain Top For It To Launch?

The European Southern Observatory had blasted off the top of a 3,000 meter high Cerro Armazones mountain in Chile just to set up Europe’s Largest Telescope – in fact it was being dubbed as “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”, according to astronomers.

Did You Know That This World's Largest Telescope Blasted Off A Mountain Top For It To Launch?

The blast took place at around 17:30 GMT in the Chilean Andes at the top of the Cerro Armazones mountain. As a result the mountain top was reduced by 40 meters to provide a plateau on which the ESO will build the revolutionary new ground-based telescope.

Did You Know That This World's Largest Telescope Blasted Off A Mountain Top For It To Launch?

Did You Know That This World's Largest Telescope Blasted Off A Mountain Top For It To Launch?

According to ESO the device was able to help astronomers in so many ways, 

Advance astrophysical knowledge, allowing detailed studies of subjects including planets around other stars, the first objects in the Universe, super-massive black holes, and the nature and distribution of the dark matter and dark energy which dominate the Universe.”

The European Extremely Large Telescope (EEL-T) was 4 times larger, 15 times faster in creating images and 16 times sharper than the Hubble Space Telescope. 

Did You Know That This World's Largest Telescope Blasted Off A Mountain Top For It To Launch?

The telescope was designed on a five-mirror scheme with the primary mirror consisting of almost 800 segments, each 1.4 meters wide, but only 50 mm thick. The secondary mirror 4.2 meters in diameter will be bigger than the primary mirrors of any of the ESO’s telescopes at La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Such a telescope may, eventually, revolutionize our perception of the Universe, much as Galileo’s telescope did, 400 years ago,” says ESO.

 

x
Please "like" us: