This Man Attempts To Drink A Bottle Of Iced Cold Water, But Things Don’t Go According To Plan

Here’s another trick that would relate to Chemistry! What would happen if a super cold water gets in contact with a “not-so-cold” surface?

This Man Attempts To Drink A Bottle Of Iced Cold Water, But Things Don’t Go According To PlanNeither do I. Maybe we should review about what our teacher taught us about matter back in high school… or maybe watch the video below! Just like what this guy did!

This Man Attempts To Drink A Bottle Of Iced Cold Water, But Things Don’t Go According To PlanThis man attempts to drink a bottle of iced cold water, but things don’t go according to plan. As soon as the liquid gets in contact with his mouth, it freezes instantly. 

This Man Attempts To Drink A Bottle Of Iced Cold Water, But Things Don’t Go According To Plan

Right then and there! Just like that!

This Man Attempts To Drink A Bottle Of Iced Cold Water, But Things Don’t Go According To PlanThe scientific reason behind this phenomenon is a process called ‘supercooling’ and it occurs when a liquid has reached a temperature lower than its natural freezing point, but has not yet become totally solid

Once the supercooled liquid interacts with something that is at a low temperature (like the moisture on this man’s lips), a rapid chain reaction of freezing is put into action. While this process seems complicated, it’s easy to replicate at home. All you have to do is leave some water bottles undisturbed in the freezer for a couple of hours.This Man Attempts To Drink A Bottle Of Iced Cold Water, But Things Don’t Go According To PlanAccording to Science Daily, 

Supercooled liquid water must become ice at minus 48 C (minus 55 F) not just because of the extreme cold, but because the molecular structure of water changes physically to form tetrahedron shapes, with each water molecule loosely bonded to four others.

Watch what happens in the video below.

 The findings suggest this structural change from liquid to “intermediate ice” explains the mystery of “what determines the temperature at which water is going to freeze.”

This intermediate ice has a structure between the full structure of ice and the structure of the liquid,” she adds. “We’re solving a very old puzzle of what is going on in deeply supercooled water,”  says Molinero, an assistant professor at the University of Utah.

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