Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

We, humans, are all fascinated with sparkly lights and we just couldn’t help it. But we’re not alone, as the ingenious hunting method of the cuttlefish above demonstrates.

Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

According to Wikipedia, a Cuttlefish is a marine animal that belongs to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopodes and nautiluses. Cuttlefish have a unique internal shell called, the cuttlebone. Despite their name, cuttlefish are not fish but molluscs.

Cuttlefish have large, W-shaped pupils, eight arms, and two tentacles furnished with denticulated suckers, with which they secure their prey. They generally range in size from 15 to 25 cm (5.9 to 9.8 in), with the largest species, Sepia apama, reaching 50 cm (20 in) in mantle length and over 10.5 kg (23 lb) in mass.

And on top of this, highly pigmented organs called chromatophores are capable of directly displaying bright reds, yellows, browns, and blacks through the cuttlefish’s skin – whichever hue best blends in with the environment around it. 

See what I mean?!

Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

You’ll get into trouble with all those catchy colors!

Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

A cuttlefish can use its nervous system to change color when threatened. Not only can the cuttlefish blend in by shifting its hue, it can hypnotize its prey… before snatching it with two deadly tentacles,” said Dave Hansford on National Geographic.

Watch How This Fish Hypnotizes Its Prey Through Its Trippy Light Shows

It really is electric skin because neurons in the brain transmit signals to the cells in the skin, instructing them to turn on and off. A cuttlefish has maybe 10 million little colour cells in its skin, and each one of them is controlled by a neuron. If you turn some on, but leave others switched off, you can create patterns,” according to Roger Hanlon, senior scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in the US.

 

Watch how this fish hypnotizes its prey through its trippy light shows. They’re like swimming techno dance clubs that will hunt and kill you!

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